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Medicaid Qualifications for Nursing Home Care | West Chester PA | Colliton Elder Law

My spouse is in a nursing home and I needhelp paying for care.

What will I have to live on if my spouse gets Medicaid?That’s one of the most common questions that we’re asked and especially I wouldsay why I’ve so concerned that if their husband goes into a nursing home and theyfind out eventually that their husband’s income will go to the nursing home, what arethey going to live on? There are two different sets of guidelines here; one of them is inthe standard rules, under Federal Law, and those who call the spouse on impoverishmentrules.

They should be called the spouse on prevention of impoverishment rules.

So thereare certain assets that you’re allowed to keep that are exempt like the house, yourcar, your personal belongings and so on.

You can set up a burial reserve and about halfof the liquid assets up to a given figure, but that really isn’t enough for a lot ofpeople, so there are other things that we do in planning that can help to extend whatyou’re able to keep, and one of the very common strategies that is used now is MedicaidDRA Compliant Annuity which is rather complicated but it will manage to have your spouse qualifyfor benefits earlier, get the same quality care, and allow you to receive an income toreplace the income that you might otherwise lose.

So, there are a lot of things that canbe done, but you need to come in early enough that we can do something about it.

You can’twait until you’re down to $20,000 or $30,000 and then come in.

You really need to let usknow well in advance, so that we’re able to plan for you.

Source: Youtube

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Paying for nursing home care | West Chester PA | Colliton Elder Law

Is it too late to do anything if my lovedone is already in a nursing home? That is a common misconception.

It is nottoo late to engage in planning if your spouse is in the nursing home.

And it was a recentcase in Pennsylvania that is what’s called the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, whichis the highest thing before the… below the United Stated Supreme Court.

There is a casein Pennsylvania that recently affirmed what are called Medicaid Annuities and that canbe done after your spouse is in a nursing home.

Now, what it does is it makes sure thatyou have… if you have enough in assets at the time you start planning, that you haveenough to certainly replace the income of your spouse that is lost when they go intothe nursing home.

We also can plan using just a basic federal government approved guidelinewithout any kind of fancy planning which is known as using a shelter allowance in orderto be able to tap into your spouse’s income.

So there are many things that can be doneafter your spouse goes into a nursing home.

Spouses are not limited by the five year lookback.

Assets can be transferred back and forth.

That’s the good side, the other side isthat assets that you have in your own name are also counted.

So you really need helpif you’re a spouse, and I really encourage you to come in and sit down with us and letus give you some ideas.

Source: Youtube

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Nursing at Home by Portea

Life can change SO MUCH in THREE years.

Checkout Anand.

His back pain has disappeared, thanks to Portea.

And he has got promoted too � in his company and ahem.

off it![When voiceover says �off it� � A very pregnant Geetha will appear by Anand�s side] But promotion means frequent official trips.

Which means.

Anand won�t be able to take care of hisfather who is recovering from a recent surgery.

[IV Infusions, injections and wound care shownin the video] And because Geetha is well.

expecting, shecould REALLY do with some help too.

But you see, they aren�t really worried.

Because Portea is just a click away! So now, Anand can schedule regular surgicalcare services from Portea.

And his dad can be treated back to healthat the comfort of his own home by highly qualified and experienced nurses!Anand�s pregnant wife and their child are also getting regular vaccinations! Now that EVERYTHING is fine at home, Anandcan travel stress-free! Anytime! Anywhere! Call us today and lose your stress!Portea � Home Health Care Services made easy! [ Contact details are displayed].

Source: Youtube

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National Nursing Home Week pt.1

post-acute care professionals are about to celebrate "National Nursing Home Week," May 8 to 14, 2016, and May is Older Americans Month, this is an excellent time for everyone to reflect on their role and how best to contribute to improving the lives of residents, patients and clients, as well as improving both the skills of the professional and the public perception of the profession.

The American Health Care Association , which established the special week in 1967, has chosen this year's theme to be "It's a Small World, with a Big Heart" to commemorate a historical time for older adults:Today's residents will remember the New York World's Fair of the 1960s and two songs popular in that era: Disney's "It's a Small World After All" and the New Seekers' "I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing," a sentiment shared by all.

"With a Big Heart" symbolizes staff and families embracing the resident or patient with individualized care, social interaction, and a compassionate heart.

Be a friend too! "Like" the Nursing Home Week Facebook page and be sure to visit the home web page here.

Join with others in the profession to recognize National Nursing Home Week.

It'll be fun! Let the community see that skilled nursing care centers indeed are operating in the fast lane of health care, yet at the pace of older adults and other vulnerable individuals.

THANKS DEANN.

NOW, HERE'S WHAT'S COMING ON UP WKYT.

Source: Youtube

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The Tragedy of Nursing Home Abuse

Nursing home abuse is tragic but avoidable.

When you factor in that almost eighty-four percent of this abuse goes unreported, theresults are truly reprehensible.

We understand the trust people place in nursing facilitiesand what happens when that trust is broken.

At PhillipsLaw.

Com we have a comprehensivepage on the types of nursing home abuse, what to look for when visiting loved ones, andwhat action can be taken if you come across any of these warning signs.

If you have any concerns regarding potential nursing home abuse, please contact us todayby visiting PhillipsLaw.

Com or calling 1-800-706-3000 for a free consultation.

Phillips Law Group, Arizona’s Law Firm.

Source: Youtube

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What happens when a nursing home and a day care center share a roof?

JUDY WOODRUFF: A new report due out laterthis week from the National Institute on Early Education Research finds that a number ofstates are struggling to find ways to improve access to high quality pre-kindergarten.

Tonight, we look at a unique approach takenby a preschool in Seattle, Washington.

It's giving children life lessons that go beyondthe classroom, and providing a unique opportunity to seniors.

Special correspondent Cat Wise has our report.

It's part of our Making the Grade series on education that airs every Tuesdays.

MARY MCGOVERN, Senior Citizen: What do yousee? CHILD: A brown bear.

CHILD: A brown bear.

CAT WISE: Mary McGovern is 95 years old, andone of her favorite things to do is read to toddlers.

MARY MCGOVERN: And what is that? A bird.

CHILD: A bird.

MARY MCGOVERN: A bird.

What color is the bird? CHILDREN: Red.

MARY MCGOVERN: Red.

Everybody knows that.

CAT WISE: Luckily for Mary, she doesn't needto go any further than down the hall to find her young friends.

MARY MCGOVERN: Oh, see, look in here is thelittle kids in there.

CAT WISE: Oh, yes.

McGovern lives at Providence Mount St.

Vincent,a nursing home in Seattle, Washington, that also houses a day care for children up to5 years of age.

WOMAN: Thank you, honey.

Thank you.

Thereyou go.

Thank you very much.

CAT WISE: Every weekday, 500 residents arejoined by 125 children in the facility affectionately called The Mount.

MAN: Peekaboo.

WOMAN: Peekaboo.

MAN: I see you.

Administrator Charlene Boyd: CHARLENE BOYD, Regional Administrator, ProvidenceMount St.

Vincent: We wanted to create a place for people to come to live, and not come todie.

CAT WISE: So, in 1991, Boyd and other administratorsadded a high-quality preschool to the nursing home and created an intergenerational learningcenter, a community for the very old and very young.

Why is there is this railing here? CHARLENE BOYD: This railing is here not forthe kids, but it's here for residents.

And it's a safety piece for a resident in a wheelchairto push themselves up and to hold on and to bring themselves to a standing position andwatch the children through the window.

CAT WISE: So, they can stand here and lookin? CHARLENE BOYD: They can stand here and lookin.

It's putting high-quality child care in asetting that link old and young together, making the magic between these two ages together,bringing joy to the residents and joy to those young children.

It's just like this magicalformula that happens every day.

WOMAN: Can I get a high-five? There.

He knowshow to do a high-five.

MARY MCGOVERN: Most of them, they're curiousabout me.

Why are you here? I tell them I'm here because, when I was living in my house,when I got too old, I wasn't always walking straight, and sometimes I would fall.

Andif fell, I had to have some help to get up, because I couldn't get off the floor.

I want to hug your baby doll.

MAUREEN MCGOVERN, Daughter of Mary McGovern:I think there are things that both parties take away from the interactions.

It's notlike a lifelong relationship, but just for that moment in time, they're both enjoyingeach other's company, and getting something out of their relationship with that personin that moment.

MARY MCGOVERN: Give me a hug.

Come on.

CHARLENE BOYD: All of us have common needsto be recognized.

All of us have common needs to be loved, and all of us have common needsto share life together.

And so these children bring life and vibrancy and normalcy.

It'sa gift.

It's a gift in exposing young families to positive aspects of aging, and it's a giftof also having children seeing frailty, normalcy and that's part of that full circle of life.

(SINGING) CAT WISE: Intergenerational activities canbe spontaneous or planned, like this sing-a-long.

MARIE HOOVER, Providence Mount St.

Vincent:There's 36 visit possible each week, so each classroom, six classrooms, has at least threevisits, up to six visits.

CAT WISE: The director of the center, MarieHoover, says children become comfortable with elderly residents at an early age.

MARIE HOOVER: Whether they're in a wheelchair,or in a walker, or maybe they're hard to understand, or you have to speak louder, it is just aboutwho that individual is, and they adjust.

The kids just don't — they really don't blinkan eye.

This is normal.

This is just who this resident is.

CAT WISE: Ninety-three-year-old Harriet Thompsonjoined this sing-a-long on her way to the dining hall.

HARRIET THOMPSON, Senior Citizen: I usuallylike to go sit down for a while before dinner, but I heard them singing, so in, we went.

CAT WISE: What do you experience internallywhen you're around these children? HARRIET THOMPSON: Happiness, just plain oldhappiness.

You know, yes, it beats anything else.

Beats television.

CHARLENE BOYD: Boredom and loneliness at sortof the plagues of older adults.

There's nothing more delightful than seeing young childrenwith noise, with laughter.

You see the residents, and they hear the sound of the kids comingdown the hall, and it's as though sunlight just came through the window.

HARRIET THOMPSON: I'm a great-great-grandmother,but they're in another town.

I can't hold my own little girl because she's far away.

And so this is what makes me happy.

You get to know them, and watch them, and act sillywith them.

And it's good to feel like you're 3 years old again.

CAT WISE: Teachers see similarities in theways these two very different age groups communicate.

MARIE HOOVER: The brain of a toddler, andas somebody is beginning to have, you know, some signs of dementia, the brains are similar,and their development, or their decline, is similar.

CAT WISE: That was apparent in this art class,where resident John Goss, a retired surgeon, and 5-year-old William Kraynek (ph) teamedup as painting partners.

JOHN GOSS, Senior Citizen: This is a junkbrush? CHILD: A giant.

JOHN GOSS: Giant, yes.

He's operating on my plain, and I'm operatingon his plain, and so we have an attachment.

He helped me, and we were working together.

CHILD: I used blue, and he used blue, andI used green, and he used green.

JOHN GOSS: It's wonderfully fun, because thingscome out of your hand, rather than your mouth.

MARIE HOOVER: The kids are certainly of thatage where this there isn't this sense of, oh, that's weird or something to be scaredof, and I think that's happening on both sides of the age.

CHILD: What's your name? ANNIE CARTER, Senior Citizen: Annie Carter.

CAT WISE: Later the same day, William Kraynekvisited the skilled nursing section of The Mount to help make sandwiches for the homeless.

CHILD: I had three sandwiches.

ANNIE CARTER: Oh, I see.

CAT WISE: Here, William partnered with 92-year-oldAnnie Carter.

ANNIE CARTER: We just talk about our work,just like anybody else on a job.

That's our job, so we have to do the right thing.

WOMAN: This is Alex.

Hi, Alex.

MAN: How you doing? WOMAN: Hi.

CAT WISE: How do the children deal with difficultsituations, like a resident that might be declining or even death? How do the childrendeal with those situations? MARIE HOOVER: Developmentally, it's not reallysomething they can conceptualize.

Even our oldest kids, at 5, kids don't quite get thatwhole death concept.

If the kids bring that up to the teachers,then the teacher's response is going to be, I miss Mary too.

What's your favorite memoryabout what she did? And those are the kinds of things they'regoing to focus in on, as opposed to somebody died.

They're just not quite ready to getthat concept.

CAT WISE: Child care at The Mount is competitivelypriced with similar high quality preschools in the area.

Currently, 400 families are onthe wait list.

Administrators believe The Mount's model canbe replicated across the country, and they expect interest to peak this summer, whena documentary featuring their work called "Present Perfect" is released.

For the "PBS NewsHour," I'm Cat Wise in Seattle.

Source: Youtube

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System changes result in better pain management at this nursing home

We were able to decrease our amount of residentswho trigger as having unmanaged pain from 25% to 12% in about a 6-month span of time.

So we knew that what we were doing was effective.

We started having weekly quality measure meetingsand addressed each resident and which QMs they triggered.

And we found that that wasn'tthe best way to go about doing it, and so we decided to go by quality measure ratherthan resident.

Nurses, we got them used to the terminology that theMDS nurses ask when they do performing their pain assessment.

And so the residents wouldbe more used to that terminology through their daily and every shift pain assessments.

And then the CNAs, also, to report to us rightaway if they felt their resident's pain was not managed appropriately and if they found specificinterventions that work nonpharmacologically for pain relief.

I thought it was very important to let themknow that we were not going to be taking away their pain medications if they say their painisn't severe, frequent or constant.

And that we were working on making sure that theirquality of life was better by having improved pain control that they were veryreceptive and that also did help decrease our amount of residents who triggered as havingunmanaged pain.

This plan is not affiliated with Life CareCenters of America.

It is put together through our building with Qualis Health and some ofthe tools that Qualis has provided us to improve our quality measures.

Source: Youtube

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Nursing Home Residents Visit Firefighters

THE SYSTEM.

SOME OMAHA FIREFIGHTERS HAD A FUN GROUP OF VISITORS TODAY.

AT THEIR STATION AT 142ND AND HARRISON.

RESIDENTS OF BROOKSTONE VILLAGE CELEBRATED "NATIONAL NURSING HOME WEEK" BY PROVIDING FIREFIGHTERS WITH A SURVIVAL KIT — COMPLETE WITH COOKIES, CANDY AND OTHER TREATS.

IT'S ONE OF THE MANY SERVICE PROJECTS THE RESIDENTS ARE WORKING ON THIS WEEK.

SARAH BIRD/BROOKESTONE VILLAGE: WE WANTED TO DO SOMETHING FOR THOSE WHO SERVE US AND SO THE RESIDENTS HAVE TAKEN TIME THE WHOLE WEEK BAKING AND PREPARING SURVIVAL KITS FOUR OUR POLICE AND FIREFIGHTERS AND SO NOW IT'S TIME TO GIVE BACK TO THE PEOPLE WHO SERVE THEM.

" THE BROOKSTONE VILLAGE RESIDENTS MADE THE DELIVRY OF TREATS TO THE FIRE STATION LOCATED NEAR 143RD AND HARRISON.

Source: Youtube

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‘No one said anything’ Suspect’s family said woman wanted out of nursing home

THE WOMAN WAS BEING HELD HERE AT THIS FACILITY AGAINST HER WILL.

SHE WAS ECSTATIC TO BE OUT OF THERE AND SHE SAID, PLEASE DON'T LET ME GET OUT OF THERE.

JOHN: HE SAYS BETH WANTED OUT OF THE NURSING HOME AND HIS BROTHER ASKED HIM TO PICK THEM UP.

>> THEY COME OUT IN A WHEELCHAIR, WE'LL DO TO MY CAR, LIFTED BETH INTO THE BACKSEAT, HE GOT IN THE BACKSEAT — FRONT SEAT, WE DROVE OFF.

NO ONE SAID ANYTHING.

JOHN: HE SAYS HE DID NOT KNOW HIS BROTHER DAVID'S PLAN.

HE IS NOW WANTED FOR KIDNAPPING.

>> WE ARE CONCERNED FOR HER SAFETY.

WE ARE CONCERNED FOR HER MEDICAL NEEDS.

JOHN: POLICE THE PLOYS MORE THAN A DOZEN OFFICERS, A HELICOPTER, AND A BLOODHOUND AS THEY SEARCHED THE PROPERTY.

ROSS SAYS HIS BROTHER CAME FROM FLORIDA TO HELP BETH, WHO HAS BEEN A LIFELONG FRIEND.

>> HE STAYED WITH HER DAILY FOR THE PAST THREE MONTHS.

JOHN: POLICE SAY BETH'S CONDITION REQUIRES CONSTANT ATTENTION.

THEY ARE WORRIED ABOUT HER SAFETY IF SHE DOES NOT HAVE ACCESS TO HER DOCTORS.

>> WE ARE TOLD THAT IF SHE DOES ALL — DOES NOT HAVE ACCESS TO DOCTORS AND MEDICATION, IT COULD BE DIRE.

JOHN: IT IS NOT CLEAR WITH EACH WHO COULD BE HEADED TONIGHT.

Source: Youtube

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Search on for woman taken from nursing home

ED LATER.

EMILY: POLICE ARE SEARCHING FOR A WOMAN TAKEN FROM A NURSING HOME, AND THEY FEAR SHE MAY BE IN DANGER.

THE FAMILY SAYS THAT'S NOT THE WHOLE STORY.

RANDY: SERA CONGI IS A NEWTON WITH WHAT WE KNOW.

REPORTER: POLICE ARE CALLING THIS A KIDNAPPING, BUT THE SUSPECTS'S BROTHER SAYS THE WOMAN WAS BEING HELD AT THIS NURSING HOME AGAINST HER WELL.

— HER WILL.

SHE WAS A STATIC TO BE OUT OF THERE, AND SHE SAID PLEASE DON'T LET ME GO BACK.

REPORTER: ROSS SAYS HIS BROTHER CAME UP FROM FLORIDA TO HELP HER.

POLICE SAY SHE WANTED OUT OF THE NURSING HOME, AND THAT IS WHY THEY ARE LIFELONG FRIENDS.

POLICE ARE NOT CONVINCED.

TH DEPLOYED A HELICOPTER AND A BLOODHOUND AS THEY SEARCHED THE PROPERTY.

WE ARE TOLD THE BROTHER ASKED HIM TO PICK HER UP YESTERDAY.

>> FRONT DOOR THE FACILITY, THEY COME OUT, ROLL OUT TO MY CAR, LIFTED HER INTO THE BACK SEAT, THEY DROVE OFF.

NO ONE STOPPED, NO ONE CAME OUT.

REPORTER POLICE SAY THAT HER CONDITION REQUIRES CONSTANT ATTENTION, AND THEY ARE WORRIED ABOUT HER NOT HAVING ACCESS TO DOCTORS.

POLICE HAV ISSUED A SILVER ALERT.

THEY ARE TRYING TO DETERMINE WHERE THEY ARE HEADED.

THE NURSING HOME MANAGEMENT HAS NOT RETURNED OUR REQUEST FOR AN INTERVIEW.

Source: Youtube